Auction Lots

Showing: 1 - 5 of 5 items


    Famous Key Date

    1916 Standing Liberty 25c PCGS/CAC MS65

    Coins We Love
    $26,750.00
     

    The 1916 is the key to the Standing Liberty quarter series, the 1916 is also the first year of issue. An attractive and original gem, this key date is very difficult to find in gem condition, let alone with the coveted CAC seal of approval. Just 52,000 coins were struck and most were not saved. CAC approved for quality.


    Finest Known!

    1854-O 50c PCGS/CAC MS67+ (Arrows) *Gold CAC*

    $99,750.00
     

    Single finest known example of this popular New Orleans Mint seated half dollar. The surfaces are intensely lustrous, the obverse features streaks of copper, gold, and deep blue toning. The reverse features deeper layers of the same coloration with subtle rose undertones as well. The striking detail is needle sharp, and as expected for the premium grade there are no distractions or contact marks of any significance. The overall eye appeal is stunning! Gold CAC approved for quality and eye appeal exceeding CAC's stringent grading standards. PCGS+ grade for premium quality at the top of end of the assigned grade.


    Struck by General Motors!

    General Motors Pattern: 1967 1c NGC MS62 BN (P-4055, 100% Copper, 4.49 grams)

    $7,600.00
     

    Similar to the Pollock-4055 pattern cent, this Pollock-Unlisted cent is believed to be from the experimental roller press that General Motors created for the Mint. This piece is simpler than the Pollock-4055 and is therefore thought to predate it. In the 1960s, there was a coin shortage that caused the U.S. Mint to contract General Motors to create a coin press with the capacity of 10,000 per minute. GM developed a small-scale prototype that was promising enough for the Mint to commission a full-scale press. However, although the press worked as planned, the maintenance required to keep the press running was its downfall. The machine had to be shut down to replace cracked dies, the dies were cracking more often due to the speed and the press and its dies required frequent lubrication, and some of the oil leaked onto the metal strips used for coins, causing an undesirable ripple effect. The only lasting evidence of this press are the prototype coins printed in the press, such as this one.