Ancient Coins

Showing: 1 - 30 of 71 items


    Strike: 5/5, Surface: 4/5

    Ancient Greek: 305-281 BC Kingdom of Thrace Lysimachus AR Tetradrachm NGC Ch VF

    $1,500.00
     

    Following the premature death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, his generals, friends, and heirs engaged in forty years of wars over his empire. Lysimachus one of Alexander's trusted companions and bodyguards, used the king's image on his own coins in order to cast himself in the role of successor and legitimize his claim to the kingdom of Thrace. Alexander, responsible for establishing the conventions of royal portraiture, is depicted in his preferred manner: youthful and clean-shaven, with long locks of hair rising above his forehead and eyes cast upward. Additionally, he is shown with horns curling around his ears. These horns of Ammon symbolize Alexander's claim that he was the son of the Egyptian god Ammon's claim reportedly confirmed by the oracle at the sanctuary of Zeus-Ammon at Siwa, Egypt. On the reverse of the coin, Lysimachus exerts his own royal autonomy by naming himself king. The goddesses Athena and Nike (Greek for Victory) crown his name with laurels, which symbolized victory or honor. The lion on the shield at Athena's side references Lysimachus's famous exploit of killing a lion with his bare hands and reinforces his association with Alexander, who used the skin of the Nemean lion as a symbol of power and courage. Lysimachus was a Macedonian Cavalry General, who served as a personal bodyguard to Alexander the Great during his conquest of Asia. After his death, he would take Thrace as governor (satrap) and later most of Asia Minor as King in 305 BC. Lysimachus would die in battle in 281 BC and would lose his kingdom.


    180/167-133 BC AR Cistophorus NGC Choice XF (Ancient Greek)

    $600.00
     

    This is an exciting and affordable offering of an extra fine example of Ancient coinage struck in Ionia, Ephesus, now modern day Turkey. The obverse (front) of this exciting Ancient coin bears the image of a cista mystica, or sacred chest, and often used to house snakes. Cistae mystica chests were used during initiation ceremonies by the followers of Bacchus, or Dionysus the famous gods of wine and drink. The cista on this coin is surrounded by a wreath. The reverse of the coin bears a bow case surrounded by 2 snakes. This coin is struck in silver and is quite desirable in this extra fine condition. Diameter is approximately 25 mm.


    180/167-133 BC Ionia AR Cistophorus NGC Ch AU (Ancient Greek) Strike: 4/5, Surface Quality: 4/5.

    $695.00
     

    Grade: Ch AU, Strike: 4/5, Surface Quality: 4/5. Obverse of Cista Mystica, wreath, Reverse of bow case, two snakes.This is an exciting offering of an about uncirculated example of Ancient coinage struck in Ionia, Ephesus, now modern day Turkey. The obverse (front) of this exciting Ancient coin bears the image of a cista mystica, or sacred chest, and often used to house snakes. Cistae mystica chests were used during initiation ceremonies by the followers of Bacchus, or Dionysus the famous gods of wine and drink. The cista on this coin is surrounded by a wreath. The reverse of the coin bears a bow case surrounded by 2 snakes. This coin is struck in silver and is quite scarce in this about uncirculated condition. Diameter is approximately 25 mm.


    Shekel of Tyre, Lifetime Issue of Jesus Christ, Rare

    Ancient Greek: 126 BC-AD 67 Phoenicia Shekel of Tyre NGC Ch VF (Flan Crack) Strike: 3/5, Surface: 4/5

    $3,150.00
     

    NGC graded CH VF, Strike 4/5 Surface 3/5; rare variety and historically important as it is a dated while Jesus Christ was alive. Known as a Lifetime issue struck years before the crucifixion of Christ. A highly desirable issue coveted by rare coin collectors because of the special date. The obverse depicts the likeness of the Phoenician god Melkart. An eagle is perched on the prow of a ship on the reverse. The Jerusalem minted Shekel continued to include the Mint mark of Tyre, a club near the eagle's foot, because Herod did not want to give the appearance that Tyre had lost power and that the Jews were sovereign in Jerusalem. The Shekel of Tyre was the main silver coin used in Judea during the time of the Temple and the New Testament. The coin used for the yearly one-half shekel donation to the Temple, and the infamous 30 pieces of silver for which Judas betrayed Jesus, are both references to the Silver Shekels of Tyre.


    Ancient Greek-Syria: AD 1198-1219 Armenia, Levon I AR Tram NGC F (Coins of the Crusades)

    $85.00
     

    The Medieval Empire is well known for the Crusades of the era. The Crusades were expeditions undertaken, in fulfillment of a solemn vow to deliver the Holy Places from Mohammedan tyranny. With seven major campaigns, the Crusades, in a historical perspective, were a failure. When Levon I, or Leo I the Magnificent, was crowned king of Armenia, Cilician Armenia was established as a powerful and united Christian state. Under Leo I?s rule, Armenian forces aided on the Third Crusade. Also called ?The Kings? Crusade,? the Third Crusade was European leaders who sought to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin. The campaign's main goal was to conquer Jerusalem, which they failed to do. Even though the Armenian forces were unsuccessful in their campaign, Leo I was able to develop commerce within the Empire. The origin of the word ?Crusade? may be traces to the cross made of cloth and worn as a badge on the outer garment of those who took part in these enterprises. The same cross can be seen on the reverse of these coins to further signify their historical significance. Each coin comes certified by the NGC and housed in a museum grade holder.


    Ancient Greek: 121-91 BC Parthian Kingdom, Mithradates II AR Drachm NGC XF

    $135.00
     

    Like many regions of the ancient world, Alexander the Great once conquered the land later known as the Parthian Kingdom. After conquered by Alexander, the region would remain together as a province of the Seleucid Kingdom before becoming independent sometime around 200 BC. By 200 BC independent rule was firmly established along the southern shore of the Caspian Sea. The region grew to include all the Iranian Plateau and the Tigris-Euphrates Valley. Throughout the reign of independence, Parthia was plagued by Scythian attacks on the northeastern borders. After defeating the Scythians, Mithradates II (123-88 BC) gained a considerable amount of territory and brokered a treaty with Rome for his Kingdom. After Mithradates II?s death, rivals vied for control, not settling until Phraates II came to power in 70 BC. Later, Rome attempted to invade several times, feeling obligated to retake the inheritance of Alexander the Great. After being routed at Carrhae in 53 BC, Rome backed off Parthia for a few centuries. Despite successfully holding Rome at bay, Parthia was ultimately overthrown by the Sasanians under Ardashir (AD 224-241). Near the end of the Parthian Kingdom, occasionally two or more rulers would reign concurrently. The ever changing ruler situation throughout Parthia's history saw many variations of coin production. The coins are a representation of the contentious battles the Parthian's fought throughout the Kingdom's history.


    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Maccabean Kings AE Prutah NGC VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Maccabean Kings AE Prutah NGC VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Hasmonean Kings, AE Prutah NGC Ch VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.