Ancient Coins  :  Ancient Roman

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    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Maccabean Kings AE Prutah NGC VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Maccabean Kings AE Prutah NGC VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 135-37 BC Judaea, Hasmonean Kings, AE Prutah NGC Ch VF (Widow's Mite)

    $85.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 103-76 BC Judaea, Alex. Jannaeus AE Prutah NGC F

    $75.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: 103-76 BC Judaea, Alex. Jannaeus AE Prutah NGC Ch F (Widow's Mite)

    $80.00
     

    Widow's Mite: A Biblical Story As Jesus looked up, he saw the rich putting their gifts into the temple treasury. He also saw a poor widow put in her two mites. "Truly I tell you," he said, "this poor widow has put in more than all the others. All these people gave their gifts out of their wealth; but she out of her poverty put in all she had to live on." Luke 21:1-4 The Christian lesson of the Widow's Mites, as relayed in Luke (21:1-4) and Mark (12:41-44), is an enduring testament to the value of faith. A destitute widow has only a few mites, ancient pennies, to her name and those she gave selflessly as her donation to the Temple. Jesus comments that her modest gift was worth more than the ostentatious contributions of the wealthy, for her mites represented all that she had. This virtuous woman had demonstrated true Christian faith in God: she could not know from where her next meal would come, but she believed that He would provide for her. During the life of Jesus Christ the mite was the smallest denomination of any Judean coin. These bronze Widow's Mites were minted at a time in Jewish history when Israel was a self-governing nation. These coins encompass a historical value that cannot be rivaled. Each coin comes housed in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation.


    Ancient Roman: AD 177-192 Commodus AR Denarius NGC VF

    $115.00
     

    The 'Golden Age' of Rome runs from the reign of Trajan (98-117) through Commodus (177-192), though some would include Nerva (96-98) as part of it. It is considered the Golden Age because it is when Rome was at its peak of power, prosperity and security. The famous historian Edward Gibbon, writing at the end of the 18th Century, has an especially well-known quote: "If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus. [96-180 A.D.]" He adds Nerva and keeps Commodus out, because Commodus' reign was disgraceful. But the collapse of the Roman world did not begin convincingly until the murder of Commodus in 192, which gave rise to a civil war and led to the greater decline of the Roman world in the 3rd Century. Commodus is popular and was made famous by the movie "Gladiator" and his notoriety in general. Many find it intriguing that Nerva, Tragan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius were all adopted heirs rather than selected from family ties. Perhaps the selection of emperors based on merit and not blood is what helped Rome soar in the Golden Age. This coin comes certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation and housed in a museum grade holder. These tangible links to Roman history are valuable additions to any size collection.


    Ancient Roman: AD 177-192 Commodus AR Denarius NGC VF

    $115.00
     

    The 'Golden Age' of Rome runs from the reign of Trajan (98-117) through Commodus (177-192), though some would include Nerva (96-98) as part of it. It is considered the Golden Age because it is when Rome was at its peak of power, prosperity and security. The famous historian Edward Gibbon, writing at the end of the 18th Century, has an especially well-known quote: "If a man were called to fix the period in the history of the world during which the condition of the human race was most happy and prosperous, he would, without hesitation, name that which elapsed from the death of Domitian to the accession of Commodus. [96-180 A.D.]" He adds Nerva and keeps Commodus out, because Commodus' reign was disgraceful. But the collapse of the Roman world did not begin convincingly until the murder of Commodus in 192, which gave rise to a civil war and led to the greater decline of the Roman world in the 3rd Century. Commodus is popular and was made famous by the movie "Gladiator" and his notoriety in general. Many find it intriguing that Nerva, Tragan, Hadrian, Antoninus Pius and Marcus Aurelius were all adopted heirs rather than selected from family ties. Perhaps the selection of emperors based on merit and not blood is what helped Rome soar in the Golden Age. This coin comes certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation and housed in a museum grade holder. These tangible links to Roman history are valuable additions to any size collection.