Ancient/World Coinage

Showing: 1 - 30 of 282 items


    Strike: 5/5, Surface: 4/5

    Ancient Greek: 305-281 BC Kingdom of Thrace Lysimachus AR Tetradrachm NGC Ch VF

    $1,500.00
     

    Following the premature death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, his generals, friends, and heirs engaged in forty years of wars over his empire. Lysimachus one of Alexander's trusted companions and bodyguards, used the king's image on his own coins in order to cast himself in the role of successor and legitimize his claim to the kingdom of Thrace. Alexander, responsible for establishing the conventions of royal portraiture, is depicted in his preferred manner: youthful and clean-shaven, with long locks of hair rising above his forehead and eyes cast upward. Additionally, he is shown with horns curling around his ears. These horns of Ammon symbolize Alexander's claim that he was the son of the Egyptian god Ammon's claim reportedly confirmed by the oracle at the sanctuary of Zeus-Ammon at Siwa, Egypt. On the reverse of the coin, Lysimachus exerts his own royal autonomy by naming himself king. The goddesses Athena and Nike (Greek for Victory) crown his name with laurels, which symbolized victory or honor. The lion on the shield at Athena's side references Lysimachus's famous exploit of killing a lion with his bare hands and reinforces his association with Alexander, who used the skin of the Nemean lion as a symbol of power and courage. Lysimachus was a Macedonian Cavalry General, who served as a personal bodyguard to Alexander the Great during his conquest of Asia. After his death, he would take Thrace as governor (satrap) and later most of Asia Minor as King in 305 BC. Lysimachus would die in battle in 281 BC and would lose his kingdom.


    Strike: 4/5, Surface: 4/5

    Ancient Greek: 5th-4th Centuries BC Achaemenid Empire AV Daric NGC MS

    $4,575.00
     

    King Darius I, 510-486 BC, was the first to issue gold darics. After his reign, many successors continued to issue similar gold darics and silver siglos. Money of the Bible sites gold darics as the first coins mentioned in the Bible. Appearing first in Chronicles 1, 19:7, and again in Ezra 8:27, the gold daric was an important currency in Biblical times. Gold darics are recorded to have been used to rebuild the Temple in Jerusalem. The Achaemenid Empire, or the First Persian Empire, during the 5th and 4th centuries BC was in a time of turmoil and war. Starting in 499 with the Ionian Revolt, the period further unraveled to become the Greco-Persian Wars. Throughout the 5th Century, the Greco-Persian Wars continued and eventually led to successive rulers switching sides of the Spartan and Athens feuds. The end 5th Century and start of the 4th Century was more peaceful, especially during the 45 year reign of Artaxerxes III. The peace did not last. The 3rd Century saw the Corinthian War and suppression of the Cyprian rebels. These coins are a tangible piece of Biblical history. Each coin comes encased in a museum grade plastic holder and certified by NGC Ancients.


    Ancient Greek: 336-323 BC Kingdom of Macedon, Alexander the Great AR Tetradrachm NGC VF

    $525.00
     

    Probably more than any ruler in history, Alexander III of Macedon truly deserved the title of Alexander the Great. Although Alexander is famous for being one of history?s greatest military strategists and for conquering most of the known world, his greatness stems from much of his honesty, humbleness and integrity which he learned from his famous tutor, Aristotle. Alexander became king before he reached the age of 20 when his father was assassinated. He immediately set out to put an end to the wars the Persians had been waging against the western world for over 200 years. His goal was clear ? to conquer the Persians in what he felt was going to be the "war to end all wars." But being a student of Aristotle, he did not want to kill and plunder the enemy, rather to treat the Persian people as his brothers and bring them a better life. These coins were minted in an age (336-323 B.C.) when Alexander the Great ruled Macedon. They are a tangible link to the history he carved. Each coin has been certified by the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation and come housed in their own museum grade holder.


    180/167-133 BC AR Cistophorus NGC Choice XF (Ancient Greek)

    $600.00
     

    This is an exciting and affordable offering of an extra fine example of Ancient coinage struck in Ionia, Ephesus, now modern day Turkey. The obverse (front) of this exciting Ancient coin bears the image of a cista mystica, or sacred chest, and often used to house snakes. Cistae mystica chests were used during initiation ceremonies by the followers of Bacchus, or Dionysus the famous gods of wine and drink. The cista on this coin is surrounded by a wreath. The reverse of the coin bears a bow case surrounded by 2 snakes. This coin is struck in silver and is quite desirable in this extra fine condition. Diameter is approximately 25 mm.


    180/167-133 BC Ionia AR Cistophorus NGC Ch AU (Ancient Greek) Strike: 4/5, Surface Quality: 4/5.

    $695.00
     

    Grade: Ch AU, Strike: 4/5, Surface Quality: 4/5. Obverse of Cista Mystica, wreath, Reverse of bow case, two snakes.This is an exciting offering of an about uncirculated example of Ancient coinage struck in Ionia, Ephesus, now modern day Turkey. The obverse (front) of this exciting Ancient coin bears the image of a cista mystica, or sacred chest, and often used to house snakes. Cistae mystica chests were used during initiation ceremonies by the followers of Bacchus, or Dionysus the famous gods of wine and drink. The cista on this coin is surrounded by a wreath. The reverse of the coin bears a bow case surrounded by 2 snakes. This coin is struck in silver and is quite scarce in this about uncirculated condition. Diameter is approximately 25 mm.